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Nonstop Wellness Blog

High-quality benefits for nonprofits.

How employers & general counsel can prepare for changes to the ACA - Benefits Pro

Don't ignore your continued compliance obligations under the current ACA. (Photo: Getty)Kristen Rasmussen recently wrote for Benefits Pro about what companies need to do to prepare for the possible repeal of, or dramatic changes to, the Affordable Care Act.

Read the full original article from Benefits Pro.

While the details of a replacement for the Affordable Care Act are fuzzy, there are three things larger employees should start doing now:

  1. Start determining what ACA provisions have been most effective for the company, and work with state representatives to make sure those needs are represented in the discussion of new legislation;
  2. If self-insured, look at what parts of the ACA benefit employees in terms of plan design;
  3. Remember that compliance under the current ACA still must be adhered to.

This third point is crucial - the law has not been repealed yet and employers must still pay attention to regulations to avoid penalties and keep their organizations in compliance. For an up-to-date and easy to use handbook of ACA penalties, download The Nonstop Guide to ACA Penalties for 2016:

Download the Guide Now! 

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The information and materials herein are provided for general information purposes only and are not intended to constitute legal or other advice or opinions on any specific matters and are not intended to replace the advice of a qualified attorney, plan provider or other professional advisor. This information has been taken from sources believed to be reliable, but there is no guarantee as to its accuracy. In accordance with IRS Circular 230, this communication is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used as or considered a ‘covered opinion’ or other written tax advice and should not be relied upon for any purpose other than its intended purpose